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20130106
20130114
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as you say spending is is a dirty word. but one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have -- the system will break down. then it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending. the bigger issue is entitlements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat, the one hardest to deal with because it's stuff peopl
think they represent necessarily the average parent who i think would prefer an environment where their child wasn't exposed to that kind of risk. >> vice president biden of course is working really hard at this and is meeting with a lot of groups. and speaking of federal law, would you be more comfortable if this was a federal law that would make it so that public schools could not have teachers who were armed or do you believe that should be up to the local districts? >> i think this needs to be a national consensus. i think we need a federal law on that. i don't -- i don't believe that -- if you create anomalous environments where those things are available, you have too much bleed thru, i think we need to have consistency across this. parents should feel comfortable regardless of where they live. >> rhonda, has there been any student reaction to this? what is their takeaway knowing the teachers in their schools may be secretly armed? >> well, i mean, you used the word "secretly." but we do have, as was mentioned, the law in the entire state of utah. and the bottom line is we a
consider this a hostile environment? social security administration reprimanding an employee whose coworker says he continuously passed gas. the agency later rescinded the punishment against the employee. i just don't know where to go with this. but is this a hostile work environment, eamon? >> i don't know. i'm just glad i'm here in the studio by myself, tyler. i'm not with you guys. i have no idea -- >> maybe we're glad we're not with you. >> how small is the cubicle, that the question. when we are in the workplace with other people, we have to deal with other people and all of their weird stuff. some of it is really weird and some of it is offensive and that's part of being a human being. >> i guess a lot of things are part after being a human being. how about you, jane? i'm interesting to hear -- >> i know, i had brothers, husband, i know all about this. my feeling is, that you know, some people obviously can't lep it. but there are product out there. gas begone. go to gasbegone.com. where the tag line is, don't blame the dog. which, by the way, i have. they have cushions. i did somethi
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
market sounds like a bull compared to that sort of an environment. >> let's talk about what harry just said though because he talked about the large umbrella-type situations that are really going to impact. demographics. >> yeah. >> the fact that the retail investor is gone. we're not going to have the same level of interest in stocks over the long term. he's expecting a big crash second half of the year. >> yeah. he's absolutely right. we've had bun buyer since 666 on the s&p in '09, the corporation itself. nobody else is in this buyer. can you imagine if somebody else does show up for a day or two? we could have a much better market. >> what's going to take us to those all-time highs, what area of the market do you want to be in to ride that wave? >> the multi-nationals. lagged the last couple of years. emerging market economies starting to do a bit better, and those companies that are geared in that direction. look, some of the u.s. companies will do fine, too. earnings are a question mark. that's -- that's part of the problem, but i think as financial and systemic risk mitigate som
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
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talk about just the overall economic environment. they say there were a lot of challenges that the industry faced during the last year, including continued low interest rates and elevated unemployment. though, they're not necessarily saying great things about what they see in the economy or at least what they had seen over the last year. only comes in one take at a time. >> where, let me see? >> keep going. >> mine does. >> mine over here. >> i got to go pop out into the next thing during the next thing. >> no. wells forgo at this point 34.99 bid. so no longer actually trading higher on this. i don't know what the metric that came out, but two cents ahead on better than expected write now. >> all right. >> okay. >> talk to an analyst. >> we're going to talk to an analyst and get him on the phone. let's get a quick check on the markets. the dow falling -- would open about 12 points lower. nasdaq off by two points. s&p 500 virtually unchanged. overseas in asia, as we do a quick fly around you can see we do have a little bit of bad news. shanghai composite off close to 2% on
very low. by historical standards. though they are starting to tick up. the default environment is still relatively benign. one of the things that i think gets lost on investors is since 2008 we have refinanced the entire high yield market. there is two ben fritz that from. one is you clearly have a lower interest rate because of lower rates but the second thing we've done is push out maturity. even if there is weakness, which we would not rule out, most companies are pretty well positioned to survive that and they don't have near term mature its. which is always a concern from a high yield investors because, you know, banks can be fickle. we know that. so from a credit standpoint, things are very strong. >> how much go you take into kri consideration, the macro economy, how much does it play when you're putting together a portfolio. >> macro sets the guard rail of the idea. you will deemphasize home builders or building products. right now for example, we are concerned about europe. from the standpoint of credit, we look at european exposure and incorporate that. you can see we
cars hurt the environment. science to push their agenda. .e choosing advilĀ® because helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's america's #1 selling pain reliever. you took action, you took advilĀ®. and we thank you. with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes, and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>eric: extreme weather in jerusalem. the holy land getting a rare snowstorm that paralyzed the city. eight inches piling up on palm trees and streets. it's been over a decade since the last snowfall in the city. michael j. fox is ready for a comeback. he says his parkinson's is under control and he'll be returning to a new tv show where he plays a character who has parkinson's. >>alisyn: some people believe their environmental plans are scientifically sound but are they ignoring evidence when it does not back up their agenda? hank campbell is the founder of science 2.0 and cofounder of science left behind, feel-good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. let's talk about suppo
, that it would be a much safer environment? >> i -- i absolutely -- i wouldn't consider carrying one if i didn't feel like i could do it safely. >> but what if you had a parent who objected to it? what position would that put you in? >> well, in the state of utah, a parent doesn't have to know about it. teachers can carry a firearm and nobody ever -- they've been doing it for 12 years. i've found out more and more about teachers that do. and employee -- >> the teachers have had guns in schools for 12 years in utah? >> yes, yes. it's been legal to do that for 12 years. >> and parents haven't known about it? >> right. you don't have to tell if you're a concealed weapon holder. >> do you think parents have a right to know? for instance, if my child was in your classroom, do you think that i would have a right to know that there is a firearm in that classroom? >> well, if -- if -- i personally would feel okay with any of the teachers, teachers i know, any teach they're i've ever met. they have the -- >> but i'm talking about the parents. >> right, right. >> i want to focus. the parents are droppin
are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuation, i'm there, and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase in equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years ago, which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either keeping troops in nato or cutting m
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
in this environment. they were supposed to be gamestop's salvation, instead down more than 15%. can you believe that? that seems like maybe management is -- they're not ready for this. maybe they don't have as good of a handle on things as they think. plus the new video game consoles that bulls are excited about do get released, they might include technology that makes it so only the original user could play that game. that would be something, right? beyond the ailing used game business, gamestop plans to grow the digital business, selling games over the internet, dramatically over the next couple of years. but, i don't see how they compete against more established online players. fact is, gamestop has to compete with amazon on way too many fronts. they sell the same gaming hardware and software, does digital down loads too, letting you buy and download games online, amazon's on fire here and they do it really well. and amazon makes it easy to find and buy used video games by connecting you with vendors and individuals all over the world who want to sell. you don't want to be in competition with ama
and get some of the issues out of the way. >> we've lived in this environment for the last 18 months, one big disaster after another. everyone is waiting for the policy response, comes at the 11th hour and 59th minute. this is a pattern everyone has gotten used to but the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling are the last big tail risks we think of the tail risks that we have to worry about, saw we would say once we get past that over the next several months we think it will lift a little bit of a cloud and investors will take risks. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> bob, thanks to you as well. ten minutes to go before we close it up. the dow jones industrial average holding on to a gain of 50 points. >> well, this herbalife soap opera is continuing. herb greenberg is coming up. all over the big move in the stock. take a look. up 3.25% right now. we'll show you what's behind it. >> and can you believe the iphone was only introduced five years ago? it is true. five years ago today, in fact, so here's a trivia question for you. the iphone alone is wort
normal, if you will, in a lot of these companies given the fact that the regulatory environment is getting worse and globalization is not necessarily on their side where it was so many years ago? is this going to be the new normal? well, i don't think so. here's the question. will the politicians get it right? will we go over the cliff, another debt ceiling and if we don't we could have a very robust capital markets this year, an that's what encourages me for the big money centers. for the smaller guys starved for loan growth and margin pressures they will be buyers. the really small guys will be the sellers and you'll see a lot of m & a opportunity out here. >> jason this morning you raised estimates on three banks. you lowered estimates on nine banks. tell me what was behind that. you're expecting the quarter to be what, more negative than positive for the sector overall? how do you see it? >> fine tuning here and there with overall estimate. i think generally for the earnings for the quarter. we think about half our banks will beat expectations. half miss. if you think during
are actually behind the counter in dispensaries, and so it's a very safe, secure, highly regulated environment that we operate in. >> okay. so 18 states have now passed medical marijuana laws. 18 states, so you -- you operate -- you operate already in california. you operate in canada. you've got dispensers coming to market in arizona in a matter of weeks. >> correct. >> what when are you likely to break into the remaining states? what's the plan for growth? >> that's a very good question because we are not just about medical marijuana. our technology crosses many boundaries in the traditional pharmacy retailing business, whether it's retail pharmacies, institutional pharmacy plays, doctor offices, hospice, long-term care, so our solution really is very broad scope and has a tremendous value proposition in traditional pharmacy and in traditional health care. in terms of medical marijuana we are on a state-by-state awareness, put if in aware ney. every state sen acting its own laws and regulations so we're currently enacting the rules in recently passed state like connecticut and massachusetts.
's there on the sidelines, and yet this market keeps going higher because of this interest rate environment, because of the easy money from central bankers. do you still see that kind of conviction on -- on the part of big buyers? >> yes, i do, and i think as we said, the global p myois telling you that we're coming from a dismal place. if you bag back to the fiscal collapse that we went through worldwide, particularly i look to china, for the impact that china continues to have on the global economy. the united states is again demonstrating, may not be the growth rate that we want, but it is in fact heading in the right direction which is why the asset class of exsis should come back into favor. we've been out of favor for years at this point. the weekly money flows we just saw, the first time we've seen positive growth. >> exactly. >> i think that money has been spent quite frankly so that's a tough trade, but at this particular point market has digested what it's going to digest. put in a great first two weeks of january, and i believe the money flows should and will continue into the united stat
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
's session. nokia on strong surge sales. the company did warn that competitive environment though remains challenging. molly corp plummeting after 2013 revenue and case flows would be weaker than expected due to falling rare earth prices. and super value, which has been in the news lately, says it plans to sell five retail grocery clans to an investor group. the price tag, $3.3 billion. as we continue on power lunch we are waiting for president obama to set to name the white house chief of staff jack lew as new treasury chief. but there are a number of people, including some on the floor, who are afraid of mr. lew, heading up treasury. we will talk about that when we come back as you look at this live picture from the white house. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a he
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
? >> about $135. and you go online and cut out the middleman. it's an a wholesale environment. that might be $250 above. people really respond to that and everybody can appreciate a value. >> a good story. a couple buddies making good. >> 200%. >> congratulations on ledbury and on your baby, more important. >>> coming up next, the president on the council of foreign relations. richard haass of the romney campaign, dan senore, much to talk about. also, mayor michael bloomberg of new york city and mika's dad, dr. brzezinski. >> well done, willie. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your
environment. there are still plenty of people who think the debt ceiling issues could be a debacle. february 15th, a little earlier than expected, a lot of people floating ideas that moody's might downgrade the u.s. debt sometime this quarter, if there's no grand bargain that ever appears, and that looks increasingly unlikely. i'm in the camp that the risk is to the down side on the stock market right now. earnings today, as you just mentioned here, look, the question has been whether or not putry was the trough in earnings that things would get better from here. it's going to be modest improvement. q4 isn't looking that great. we're only looking at roughly 3% improvement in earnings. that's not great. top line growth has been nonexistent throughout last year. q3 top line growth was zero. zero. we haven't seen that in a long time. you want to know how weird that is? the ten-year eenaverage is 7%. maybe it will be 3%. that's the hope. it's coming down as we're going in. so we may be at a trough in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter certainly isn't going to be gangbusters right now here
the environment for sleep conducive to sleep, but in addition to that, doctors are getting very little education on sleep. and they're not addressing the sleep the way they need to. and so unfortunately when patients come to see physicians, what happens is they'll dispense sleeping pills and never get at the root cause. so if you get at the root cause, you can help a patient solve these problems and sleeping pills were never meant to be used for more than four to six weeks. after four to six weeks, you really want to be transitioning off the pills and using other modalities to help you sleep. >> that's scary to think of the things you can forget if you take this pill. so many people take it. dr. carol ashe, thanks so much. >> thank you for having me, brooke. >>> hundreds of amateur snake hunters from all over the world are heading to the florida everglades. they have machetes. they have guns. this is the first competition of its kind, folks, it's a python hunt. for one month here, a contest starting tomorrow, drawn in 500 people, more than a thousand bucks up for grabs for the person who catches
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
to sort of build a better environment for consumers, dr. sachs, where is the consumer today on being treated fairly by the banks, being given clear information, being not put in situations where they're going to go under water like still so many americans are with their mortgages? >> well, i think we're all confused. >> have any of them improved? >> i think there's probably a little improvement. i think elizabeth war knoren is going to make a big difference because she's going to be watching absolutely. i think the truth is the bankers still run the show in washington as well as on wall street. the thing about bailing out banks, even if you had to bail out the financial system, you don't have to bail out the bankers. and that's where they didn't know how to draw the line. and i think what you said, joe, is absolutely right. the campaign contributions have been the focus on both parties. this time they went wildly for the republican side because it's true. you do the slightest thing, it's indignation. you only gave us hundreds of billions of dollars of bailout. how dare you say a word
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)